Volunteer delivering aid to Ukraine visits Maine with updates on the war

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SAT DOWN WITH HIM AT A CHUH RC IN SANFORD TO TALK ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCE. ? <TALIA STANDUP IN> WAS JUST IN UKRAINE LA ST WEEK.. WITH HIS VOLUNTR EE TEAM. ROMANIAN NON- PROFIT CALLED VALORE PL US . THE VOLUNTEER TEAM REGULARLY TRAVELS ACROSS THE BOARDER FROM ROMANIA INTO UAIKRNE TO PROVIDE HUMANITARIAN AID. THEY CAN DO THIS, IN PART.. THANKS THEIR PARTNERSHIP AND DONATIONS FROM CURTIS LAKE CHURCH IN SANFORD. PAUDR ET SAYS THE NEED HAS SHIFTED SINCE WE LAST SPOKE IN MARCH.. TO UKRAINIAN REFUGEES LOOKING TO RETURN TO THEIR COUNTRY. IN CLUDING SOLIDER WIVES AND CHILDREN, WHO WILL LIKELY RETURN AND FIND NOTHING LEFT. SOT MARIAN PADURET / VALORE PLUS NON- PROFIT IN ROMANIA> 21;29 “THE FIRST HOUSES THAT HAVE BEEN DESTROYED WAS ALWAYS THE HOUSES OF UKRAINIAN SOLDIERS AND UNFORTUNATELY THOSE PEOPLE COME BACKO T NOTHING, JUST A PI OF LE RUBBLE.. THEY START ALL OVER FROM SCRATCH FROM ZERO.” PAUDRET SAYS THE GROUND FIGHTI NG AGAINST RUSSIAN SOLDIERS IS MAINLY IN EASTERN UKRAINE.. DESPITE THE RISK.. HE SAYS HIS TEAM ACTUALLY DELIVERS FOOD, MECIDINE AND HYGENE PRODUCTS TO VILLAGES IN THOSE AREAS. <SOT MARIAN PADURET / VALORE PLUS NON- PROFIT IN ROMANIA> 16;36 “THERE IS A LEVEL OF DANGER BUT WHEN YOU REALLY THINK OF THE PEOPLE WHO NEED HELP, WE REALLY DON’T FOCUS ON THE DANGER.” PAUDRET SAYS A MEMORY THAT STICKS OUT TO HIM.. IS OF A MAN W HO DROVE 20 MILES TO MEET HIS VOLUNTEER TEAM.. AFTER HEARING HOW HOSPITABLE ROMANIANS HAD BEEN TO UKRAINIAN REFUGEES. <SOTAR MIAN PADURET / VALORE PLUS NON- PROFIT IN ROMANIA> 31;39 “HE NEVER MEA T ROMANIAN SO HE CAME AND STOPPED CAR IN FRONT OF US, HE STARTS TO SPEAK UKRAINIAN WE DIDN’T UNDERSTAND WHAT’S GOING ON.” 31;54 “SO HE CAME OUT OF THE CAR, STARTED SAKINPEG OUT LOUD.. AND HE WAS SEARCHING FOR A ROMANIAN TO HUG HIM.. ANTHE D TR ANSLATOR SAID HE WANTS TO SEE A ROMANIAN TO HU I G” ASKED PAUDRET HOW THAT HUG FELT. <SOT MARIAN PADURET / VALORE PLUS NON- PROFIT IN ROMANI A> 32;13 “IT REAL FLYELT WARM.. YOU HAVE SOMEONE THAT YOU NEVER MET, JUST A PERSON THAT I DON’T KNOWF I I’LL EVER MEET HIM AGAIN.. HE DROVE ALMOST 20 MILES JUST TO SAY THANK YOU.” PAUDRET SAYS MAINERS CAN HELP THE PEOPLE OF UKRAI NE BY DONATING TO NON- PROFITS LIKE HIS.. OR WRITING TO THEIR SENATOR SHOWING

Volunteer delivering aid to Ukraine visits Maine with updates on the war

The Romanian pastor and non-profit leader says he doesn’t want the west to lose sight of the ongoing suffering in Ukraine

So far, about 5 million people have evacuated Ukraine, 1 million of them crossing the border into Romania. Marian Paudret is a pastor and leader of the Romanian non-profit called Valore Plus. The group has about 100 volunteers who have been helping refugees across the border and bringing humanitarian into Ukraine since the war started back in February. Curtis Lake Church in Sanford runs a global outreach program, and Paudret has been one of their partners for the past 10 years. They communicate back and forth, and have been giving donations to Valore Plus to help the people of Ukraine. This June, Paudret made his annual trip to Sanford to speak to the congregation about the situation on the ground in Ukraine. During his presentations, he provides videos and photos of the damage and is able to answer questions about what the current needs are for people there. Paudret says there are still missiles shot at Kiev, but the Russian soldiers have been pushed out. He says the ground fighting against Russian soldiers is mainly in the eastern part of the country. Paudret and his volunteer team deliver food, medicine and hygiene products to villages in the east, despite the risk. He says crowds of people flock to their trucks to receive a box full of essentials. Paudret says their requests are simple, the most recent one being a delivery of salt, which they are unable to get on their own due to the ongoing war. Back in March, there were long lines of people trying to evacuate Ukraine. Now, Paudret says there is a shift in people looking to go back to Ukraine. Volunteers with Valore Plus help transport people back into the country, including solider wives and children. Martial Law has required all Ukrainian men ages 18-65 to stay and fight for their country. Some families who separated are now looking to reunite. During the war, Ukrainian soldier homes were the first to be destroyed by Russian soldiers. Paudret says, “unfortunately those people come back to nothing, just a pile of rubble. They start all over from scratch.” He adds, “we drive through villages that almost no house was standing, everything has been leveled.”Paudret says it is crucial for the west to stay up to date with the ongoing war in Ukraine. He says, “It’s easy for us in the west to forget what’s going on in Ukraine because it’s far away, because we don’t want to see bad news, but it’s crucial for us to remember every day and to do whatever we can.” Paudret says he hopes government in the US, Great Britain, France and Germany will supply the Ukrainian army with weapons to fight back against Russia. He says Mainers can help by donating to non-profits like his or writing to their senator showing support for Ukraine.

So far, about 5 million people have evacuated Ukraine, 1 million of them crossing the border into Romania. Marian Paudret is a pastor and leader of the Romanian non-profit called Valore Plus. The group has about 100 volunteers who have been helping refugees across the border and bringing humanitarian into Ukraine since the war started back in February.

Curtis Lake Church in Sanford runs a global outreach program, and Paudret has been one of their partners for the past 10 years. They communicate back and forth, and have been giving donations to Valore Plus to help the people of Ukraine. This June, Paudret made his annual trip to Sanford to speak to the congregation about the situation on the ground in Ukraine. During his presentations, he provides videos and photos of the damage and is able to answer questions about what the current needs are for people there.

Paudret says there are still missiles shot at Kiev, but the Russian soldiers have been pushed out. He says the ground fighting against Russian soldiers is mainly in the eastern part of the country. Paudret and his volunteer team deliver food, medicine and hygiene products to villages in the east, despite the risk. He says crowds of people flock to their trucks to receive a box full of essentials. Paudret says their requests are simple, the most recent one being a delivery of salt, which they are unable to get on their own due to the ongoing war.

Back in March, there were long lines of people trying to evacuate Ukraine. Now, Paudret says there is a shift in people looking to go back to Ukraine. Volunteers with Valore Plus help transport people back into the country, including solider wives and children. Martial Law has required all Ukrainian men ages 18-65 to stay and fight for their country. Some families who separated are now looking to reunite. During the war, Ukrainian soldier homes were the first to be destroyed by Russian soldiers. Paudret says, “unfortunately those people come back to nothing, just a pile of rubble. They start all over from scratch.” He adds, “we drive through villages that almost no house was standing, everything has been leveled.”

Paudret says it is crucial for the west to stay up to date with the ongoing war in Ukraine. He says, “It’s easy for us in the west to forget what’s going on in Ukraine because it’s far away, because we don’t want to see bad news, but it’s crucial for us to remember every day and to do whatever we can.” Paudret says he hopes government in the US, Great Britain, France and Germany will supply the Ukrainian army with weapons to fight back against Russia. He says Mainers can help by donating to non-profits like his or writing to their senator showing support for Ukraine.



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